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Minorities and Cancer; the Fight to Close the Racial Gap and Saving Lives

Posted on: April 15th, 2015 by vgmforbin
For National Minority Health Month, we want to offer information about the conditions that African American people are at a higher risk for.

For National Minority Health Month, we want to offer information about the conditions that African American people are at a higher risk for.

As we discussed in our last blog, some minority groups have higher occurrence rates and lower survival rates than others.  LA Medical encourages everyone to have the best health possible through healthy lifestyles, disease management and cancer screenings for all people.

This month is National Minority Health Month and we are trying to offer open dialogues about improving the health of all people by discussing the research done on these cancer-affected groups.

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), cancer death rates for women are highest among blacks, followed by whites, Hispanics, and Asian/Pacific Islanders.

Research from the American Cancer Society finds that African-Americans have the highest death rate and shortest survival rates after diagnosis of any racial and ethnic group in the U.S. for most cancers.

  • It is estimated that about 169,000 new cancer cases will be diagnosed among African-Americans by year’s end. Approximately 66,000 African-Americans will die from cancer.
  • African-American women are 40 percent more likely to develop cervical cancer caused by the STD human papillomavirus (HPV), and 20 percent more likely to die from it compared to white women.
  • African-American men were almost twice as likely to have new cases of stomach cancer as white men.
  • African-American women are 2.1 times as likely to have been diagnosed with stomach cancer as white women, and they are 2.4 times as likely to die from stomach cancer, as compared to non-Hispanic white women.
  • Prostate, lung and colorectal cancers are the most commonly diagnosed cancers among African-American men and the most common cancers are breast, lung and colorectal in African-American women.

Lifestyle changes and screenings are the best weapons against cancer. Follow-up care is vital for those that have been diagnosed and are being treated or any types of cancer. For people living with cancers, LA Medical has equipment and supplies to improve your life. Please see us for wheelchairs, hospital beds, and other equipment that will help you stay comfortable and safe throughout the process.

 

Sources CDC.gov and the National Association of Social Workers

Minorities and Cancer; the Fight to Close the Racial Gap and Saving Lives

Posted on: April 14th, 2015 by vgmforbin
April is Minority Health Month and we want to inform you about common health issues for those of Asian heritage.

April is Minority Health Month and we want to inform you about common health issues for those of Asian heritage.

Cancer affects everyone from the youngest babies all the way up to the oldest citizens. But some minority groups have higher occurrence rates and lower survival rates than others. LA Medical wants everyone to have the best health possible and encourages healthy lifestyles, disease management and cancer screenings for everyone.

April is set aside as National Minority Health Month to bring awareness to these discrepancies and open dialogues about improving the health of all people. The research done on these cancer-affected groups focuses both the rate of getting cancer diagnosis and the survival rates. The American Cancer Society, the Intercultural Cancer Council (ICC) and the National Center or Reducing Asian American Cancer Health Disparities has compiled statistics on cancer discrepancies between Asian Americans and other cultures.

Cancer statistics compiled among Asian-Americans from the Intercultural Cancer Council (ICC) shows many disproportionate findings.

  • Chinese have the highest mortality rates for lung and bronchial cancer among all Asian subgroups.
  • Japanese have the highest incidence rates for colorectal cancer, female breast cancer, and uterine cancer and the highest mortality rates for colorectal cancer and uterine cancer among all Asian subgroups.
  • Koreans have the highest incidence and mortality rates of stomach cancer among all Asian subgroups and the lowest rate of colorectal cancer screening.
  • Cervical cancer incidence rates in Vietnamese women are five times higher than the rate among White American women is the number one cancer to occur in Vietnamese women.
  • Vietnamese men have the highest rates of liver cancer for all racial/ethnic groups.
  • The incidence of liver cancer in Chinese, Filipino, Japanese, Korean, and Vietnamese populations are 1.7 to 11.3 times higher than rates among White Americans.
  • Cancer has been the number one killer of Asian American women since 1980.
  • Among Asian Americans, colorectal cancer is the second most common diagnosed cancer, and it is the third highest cause of cancer-related mortality.

Lifestyle changes and screenings are the best weapons against cancer. Follow-up care is also vital for those that have been diagnosed and are being treated or any types of cancer. For people living with any type of cancer, LA Medical has equipment and supplies to improve your life. Please see us for wheelchairs, hospital beds or anything else that will make the journey through cancer safer and more comfortable.

 

Sources: The Center for Disease Control, The American Society, The Intercultural Cancer Council (ICC)